Q. ninqui carcar yarra “the white rocks snarling”

Q. ninqui carcar yarra, “the white rocks snarling”

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The sixteenth line of the Markirya poem (MC/222). The first word is the plural of the adjective ninquë “white” modifying the plural of the noun carca “rock”, followed by the infinitive (or short active-participle) of the verb yarra- “to snarl”, used adjectivally. Note that carca normally means “fang, tooth”, so its uses for “rocks” here may be poetic to describe sharp rocks, as suggested by Helge Fauskanger (AL/Markirya).

Decomposition: Broken into its constituent elements, this phrase would be:

ninqu-i carca-r yarra = “*white-(plural) rock-(plural) snarling”

Conceptual Development: In the first draft, noun was the plural of ondo “rock” (MC/222).

References ✧ MC/222

Glosses

Variations

Changes

Elements

ninquë “white, pale; chill, pallid, cold” plural ✧ MC/222 (ninqui); MC/222 (ninqui)
carca “tooth, fang; [sharp] rock” plural ✧ MC/222 (karkar)
yarra- “to growl, snarl” infinitive ✧ MC/222; MC/222
ondo “stone (as a material), (large mass of) rock” plural ✧ MC/222 (ondor)

Element In


ᴱQ. ondoli losse karkane “the white rocks snarling”

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The fifteenth line of the Oilima Markirya poem (MC/213). The first word is the plural of ondo “rock” modified by the plural of the adjective lossa “white”, with the “bare stem” infinitive form of the verb karka- “to snarl”, as suggested by Gilson, Welden, and Hostetter (PE16/84, notes on line #10 and #11), apparently functioning as either an active-participle or a verbal object.

Decomposition: Broken into its constituent elements, this phrase would be:

ondo-li loss-e karka-ne = “*rock-(plural) white-(plural) snarl-ing”

Reference ✧ MC/213 ✧ “the white rocks snarling”

Elements

ondo “stone, rock” plural ✧ MC/213 (ondoli)
#lossa “white” plural ✧ MC/213 (losse)
karka- “to snarl” infinitive ✧ MC/213 (karkane)

Element In